NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICER (NCO) HAS SECURITY CLEARANCE REINSTATED

Recently, a noncommissioned officer (NCO) represented and defended by attorney Richard V. Stevens (Military Defense Law Offices of Richard V. Stevens, P.C.) had their security clearance reinstated and military career preserved.

Because this was an administrative disciplinary case, there are Privacy Act issues and regulations that preclude the reporting of specific details. However, what can be generally described is…

The NCO client received an administrative disciplinary action and notification of revocation of security clearance. If the security clearance was revoked, the client would face involuntary administrative discharge due to lack of requisite security clearance. Through the course of the processing of this case, the defense submitted multiple rebuttals. This included a rebuttal to the DoD Consolidated Adjudications Facility (CAF). Ultimately, the client received notification that the security clearance was reinstated and, therefore, the client would not face involuntary administrative discharge.

While this military case was successfully defended, it is important to understand that every case has different facts, and success in previous cases does not guarantee success in any particular future case. No military lawyer or civilian defense lawyer, including those who specialize in military law, can guarantee the outcome of any military trial or case.

For more information about the military justice system, particularly administrative disciplinary cases, please see:

  • https://militaryadvocate.com/practice-areas/administrative-discipline-actions/
  • https://militaryadvocate.com/practice-areas/article-15-njp-captains-mast-office-hours/
  • https://militaryadvocate.com/practice-areas/administrative-dischargeseparation/
  • We offer free consultations for a case you may be involved in. Just call us.
    Thank you.

    Attorney Richard Stevens

    Mr. Stevens has been handling military cases since 1995. He has defended military cases dealing with the most serious military offenses, including allegations of “war crimes,” national security cases, murder, manslaughter, homicide, rape, sexual assault, other sex related offenses, drug offenses, computer crimes (pornography), larceny, fraud, AWOL/desertion, conduct unbecoming, military academy offenses, offenses within combat zones, senior officer cases and other military specific offenses around the world. [ Attorney Bio ]

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